Debris Flow Travel Distance: Field Traverse Data and Regional Guidelines for Terrain Stability Assessment

Advances in understanding the nature of debris flow behavior, and consequent improvements to landslide risk mitigation, depend to a large extent on the collection, analysis and interpretation of event data. Data that are collected in a systematic manner allow for a direct comparison of events within a region and, more generally, also enable a comparison of event characteristics between different regions. A systematic approach has been developed in British Columbia for collecting field data while traversing the path of a debris flow event, from the point of origin to the point of terminal deposition. The nature of the current methodology is described as a step-by-step procedure, with reference to the landslide profile data card developed by the BC Ministry of Forests. Its application is illustrated with field data and interpretation of those data for guidance on debris flow travel distance, with application to terrain stability assessment in forest development planning.

Fannin, R.J., M. Busslinger and P. Jordan. 2012. “Debris Flow Travel Distance: Field Traverse Data and Regional Guidelines for Terrain Stability Assessment,” in: 11th International and 2nd North American Symposium on Landslides, Protecting Society through Improved Understanding, Banff, Alberta, June 3-8, 2012. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press.

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