Highway Embankment Performance on Compressible Clay at Highway 1/ 200th Street, Langley, British Columbia

The Highway 1 / 200th Street area in Langley, British Columbia is underlain by some of the softest and most compressible clays in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia. Geologically, the clay was deposited in marine environment following retreat of the Vashon ice sheet from this region some 13,000 years ago. Extensive field and laboratory tests have illustrated the sensitive and highly compressible nature of the clay deposit in this area. The data also indicated that the clay at 200th Street is even more compressible than other deep clay deposits in Langley and Surrey. Highway developments at 200th Street over the last 50 years have met significant challenges, particularly embankment settlements adjacent to piled grade separation structures. This paper describes the properties of the clay at Highway 1 / 200th Street, compares these properties to those of other clays nearby, and presents the settlement performance of the highway embankments at Highway 1/ 200th Street, including the original 200th Street overpass built in the 1960s that has since been demolished, and the new replacement interchange that was completed in 2004. Lessons learned from highway developments on this highly compressible clay deposit are described.

open access; http://v-g-s.ca/2012-proceedings

Sy, A. and D. Gillespie. 2012. “Highway Embankment Performance on Compressible Clay at Highway 1/ 200th Street, Langley, British Columbia”, in 20th Vancouver Geotechnical Society Symposium: Soft Ground Engineering, June 8, 2012, Vancouver, BC.

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